Kids RPG Journal – #49 Monster Color Process

I haven’t had much opportunity to work on making new art for the kids game recently, but I wanted to get some monsters onto the Harrowlands site, so I decided to finally color in some of last year’s Inktober beasties. I didn’t get real far with Inktober because the day job started melting down and I was working way too many hours to participate.

Not all was bad, however, because the work burnout made me stumble upon the specifics of doing the Kids RPG Journal and slowly making the Harrowlands game for the boys. I likely wouldn’t have gone down this particular path if I had more time and was not dissatisfied back then.

I’ve taken to paying just a little more attention to how I’m coloring in my monsters and other game resources recently, as some of the previous items were coming out a bit muddy. I think it was a combination of the muted palette and the Drippy Deek brushes which are a little bit darker and less chromatic than some other brushes.

One thing I had not been doing, but started up again, was putting a background color under my artwork. Working on top of white is fine, particularly in the watercolor painter mindset, which is how I approach my work on the game, but painting over a base color gives it some much needed pop without going back to the more outlandish color palettes I was using before.

hungry dead monsters from Inktober, colored in with an older brighter palette

I found I had already colored in a couple of them with the previous palette and was working on a third, but I just was not feeling it. I went back and started over again and can say I’m pretty happy with the results.

monster ghoul with just the base color

For the ghoul, I started with a lighter yellow background color which tied the colors in nicely and I felt I could do a little bit more with the wash brushes.

Final colored version of the ghoul

The end result came up much better than what I was going with on the first try.

vampyr with just base color

For the vampyr, I chose a muted blue green to accentuate the undead nature. It gives a nice base, particularly under the skin tones that makes the “otherness” really come through.

vampyr in full color

All in all, I’ll probably go back and color in all of the previous Inktober pieces. For now,

Kids RPG Journal – #18 First NPC

NPCs (Non-Player Characters) are the lifeblood of role-playing games. They make up all the people and monsters not controlled by the players, which means the DM (Dungeon Master – i.e. me) has to give all of them interesting personalities and motivations. If find they are even more vital to the game experience than any cool plot ideas and wild locations you can come up with for the players. If the people in the world are boring, the game will be boring.

I find it easier for me to get into a character if I do a quick sketch of them, so I try to have a large number of NPCs ready to go with illustrations and notes how to play them, any voices and mannerisms, motivations, and a couple of quick thoughts on how they view others around them and if there are any good clues they can give out.

Today’s NPC illustration is the húskona (woman landowner), “Momma” Yrla, who the players will meet in their first adventure.

Momma Yrla, landowner and farmer.

I added a process shot of the color palette I use for all of my digital artwork in Clip Studio, which is based off of the various watercolors I keep in my little travel kit. Each color is blended with all of the others so I can blend pretty easily. The Drippy Deek brush has a pretty low chroma, which allows me to layer on the color until I have the intensity I like.

Momma Yrla process shot with color palette in Clip Studio Paint

In a later post, I’ll flesh out some of Momma Yrla’s personality and history and put it in context for the game. I think I should also do a post on my traditional watercolors and how I have them aligned with my digital ones.