Kids RPG Journal – #39 Episode 2 Image

Last Saturday, we ran an hour-long session and completed our first quest, “Flight from the Bumblebees”. It was lots of fun and pretty wild, with lots of flailing of arms and sound-effects. I think there were a lot of learnings I took away from this one, which is pretty cool.

After 30 years of DMing, I am still learning with practically every session.

I have a lot of work to get the audio ready for consumption, as there are a lot of instances of us saying the kids’ names that I want to trim out. I’m also tempted to splice some audio in because there were a number of points where I couldn’t remember basic words like “reigns” and “wick”, so I simply flap my arms and call them “thing”.

Anyways, the audio is coming sometime this week, but I wanted to get a session recap illustration in. This one was a lot of fun and I knew what I wanted to draw right away. Each of the characters had at least one moment where they failed miserably at their task, and these were the moments everyone at the table loved the most.

second session overview initial noodle sketches.

First, I did a couple of really scribbly sketches to see how I wanted to lay it out. I don’t really thumbnail my artwork, instead I like draw noodles all over the page until one of them starts to look like something I think I can be happy with. Here, I didn’t do enough sketches of Thule accidentally throwing the bells out into the field and had to rework it a number of times on the tablet.

second session overview sketch with rough horses

Since I don’t really know what horses look like, I just put blob-like shapes with legs and then googled some illustrated horses while I was doing the “red pencil” sketching. I use the red pencil in Clip Studio just as I use red leaded pencils in my sketchbook: where I try to transition from scribbles to cleaner lines.

second session overview inks

Next comes the inking stage. Once I’m done inking I like to lay down some white flat colors behind the foreground shapes, and use that layer like a mask for coloring the illustration.

second session overview final image.

I am enjoying the refined color palette quite a bit and I don’t feel it’s too restrictive at all. We’ll see what I choose to do when I have something like magical effects, and see if I can be creative with the colors then.

I had a great time drawing Iona, Bursten, and Thule in their finest moments from the weekend. Even an unconscious Plunk, a bag full of bees, and two horse-ish creatures were lots of fun to quickly bust out, before I have to move on to the next upcoming session.

Kids RPG Journal – #26 Installing Fonts

In an effort to improve my workflow for the kids’ RPG project, I needed to add some fonts to my iPad so I could access them in Clip Studio Paint, instead of having to overlay text off of my desktop after exporting jpegs. Since I couldn’t remember exactly how I’d done this in the past, I decided to track my steps here in the journal.

For this, I need two programs: Dropbox (both on the desktop and laptop to sync files), and All Fonts on the iPad.

Copy font files to Dropbox

First, you will need to sync up a folder on Dropbox between your desktop and iPad. This is incredibly useful for nearly everything and is the only way to make file management halfway usable on iOS (but that is for another blog post).

I have the fonts already installed on my Mac, so I opened Font Book and right-clicked on the font I wanted and selected Show in Finder.

select Show in Finder within Font Book


This shows me the folder the font is stored and makes it easy for me to copy and paste into my Dropbox sync folder.

folder location of fonts for copying to Dropbox


Once the files are copied over, they are automagically synced on your devices, so I switched over to the iPad.

Transfer fonts to iPad using All Fonts

All Fonts application for iPad


All Fonts makes the transferring of fonts super easy once they are in your Dropbox.

All Fonts transfer fonts view


Open the app and click on the little cloud download icon in the upper right corner and select Browse.

All Fonts transfer view - select browse


Make your way to the Dropbox sync folder and find the font you want to transfer.

go to Dropbox sync folder to locate fonts


Click on it and it will give you a popup saying it is imported. After a minute or so, the font should show up in your Transferred Fonts view.

All Fonts: transferred fonts view

Install transferred fonts

Once you see it on the screen, click on the font and it will show you a font preview.

All Fonts: font preview


Click the Install Font button at the bottom. Follow the instructions on the dialogs. If the profile is not signed, you may need to confirm you want to install the font a few times before it shows up. Repeat the process for all fonts you want to add.

Check font is in Clip Studio Paint

If I already have Clip Studio Paint open, I find that I have to restart my iPad in order to get the new fonts to show up in the text tool.

Clip Studio Paint on iPad - text tool property to locate your new fonts


After that, you can organize your fonts by creating custom lists and they will be available for all applications.

Kids RPG Journal – #17 Character Portrait Colors

I spent the weekend with the boys and had to switch gears from the Lore and Notes cards to work on something that they could watch me work on, so instead of spoilery adventure bits, I decided to color their character portraits: Thule Bonecrusher and Bursten Claw-jaw

Once again, I used Clip Studio Paint for my artwork. I wanted a pretty loose watercolor style, so I did not do any sort of color flats, but instead filled things in by hand, not worrying too much about the getting the color consistently up against the line art.

Bursten Claw-jaw color detail in Clip Studio Paint

I used the Drippy Deek brush from the Frenden brush pack, which has a great watery texture and a cool edge to the stroke that has extra pigment, or whatever the digital equivalent is. I typical do 2 to 3 passes to get the effect I want. I work on multiple layers so I can be overlap the linework and then go back with the transparency brush with a sharper Frenden brush to erase any errant edges.

Clip Studio Paint transparancy brush

And here are the boys’ characters:

Thule Bonecrusher, the Thunder Priest class raised by barbarians in the frozen Northlands.

Thule Bonecrusher character portrait colors

Bursten Claw-jaw, the Wolf Feral who discovered a mystical wolf pelt in the Dark Woods and has been imbued with the spirit of a wolf ever since.

Bursten Claw-jaw character portrait colors