Kids RPG Journal – #24 Catch Up

Process on the game has slowed down a bit as I’ve been playing catch-up at the day job from the holiday weekend. Oddly enough, the weekends are the hardest time for me to get personal work done.

I think it’s due to two reasons: First, I’m around the kids more and spend a lot of my time and energy. Entertaining 6-year-olds is a lot more labor intensive than web development. When I do have a break, I’m either doing chores, or I’m trying to recuperate. Even when they are playing on their own, I sometimes have trouble with focus because of the ambient noise.

Second, there’s no real structure with the weekends. We’re often going somewhere or doing activities that we can’t get in during the week, so I cannot get into a routine as easily.

That said, I made a couple of place drawings this week and worked on adjusting the players’ custom moves.

Yrlashof, jutland-style longhouse of Momma Yrla

Yrlashof, the first real location the players will visit. The long house of Momma Yrla. I based the design of the farm off of Jutland Viking structures, with a little fantasy embellishment.

Viking-style haystacks on Yrlashof

Viking-style haystacks. A sub-location (or zone, to steal from FATE) on the farm. It’s interesting to look into how different certain elements look from what I see in my life. I could get lost in researching how medieval and ancient peoples worked and lived.

Kids RPG Journal – #18 First NPC

NPCs (Non-Player Characters) are the lifeblood of role-playing games. They make up all the people and monsters not controlled by the players, which means the DM (Dungeon Master – i.e. me) has to give all of them interesting personalities and motivations. If find they are even more vital to the game experience than any cool plot ideas and wild locations you can come up with for the players. If the people in the world are boring, the game will be boring.

I find it easier for me to get into a character if I do a quick sketch of them, so I try to have a large number of NPCs ready to go with illustrations and notes how to play them, any voices and mannerisms, motivations, and a couple of quick thoughts on how they view others around them and if there are any good clues they can give out.

Today’s NPC illustration is the húskona (woman landowner), “Momma” Yrla, who the players will meet in their first adventure.

Momma Yrla, landowner and farmer.

I added a process shot of the color palette I use for all of my digital artwork in Clip Studio, which is based off of the various watercolors I keep in my little travel kit. Each color is blended with all of the others so I can blend pretty easily. The Drippy Deek brush has a pretty low chroma, which allows me to layer on the color until I have the intensity I like.

Momma Yrla process shot with color palette in Clip Studio Paint

In a later post, I’ll flesh out some of Momma Yrla’s personality and history and put it in context for the game. I think I should also do a post on my traditional watercolors and how I have them aligned with my digital ones.